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Tags » ‘cars’

On January 27 1929 a convoy consisting of five Bugatti started their journey through the Sahara

September 20th, 2017 by admin

The cars are built as pick-ups and with 800 kilograms of goods on them they are hopelessly overloaded. Amongst other things, each car carries 260 litres of benzin, 20 litres of oil and 20 litres of water. About half of the load is the personal luggage of the travelers and most of the participants have even planned to carry out hunting excursions on the southern edge of the Sahara – and they do not want to do that without a certain level of personal comfort. One of the participants, Lieutenant Loiseau, warns about the too heavy load even before they start the journey: He intends to do a record-trip from Paris to Cite d’Ivoire and back…

Some of the participants of this journey do not believe that they can leave some of their luggage back they buy a truck to join them instead!

http://www.desert-vehicles.org/index.php?article_id=243

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On January 27 1929 a convoy consisting of five Bugatti started their journey through the Sahara

Sam Pierce, sponsor for Burt Munro’s Indian Special, and Indian Motorcycle specialist in San Gabriel

September 20th, 2017 by admin

When the Depression hit, Sammy turned to his motorcycle for a living, performing stunts and racing at county fairs. Along the way he acquired an expertise for sheet metal, designing and fabricating custom cars. But bikes were his passion, and in 1945, after a stint in the Navy during World War II, he swung a deal to become the California distributor for Norton.

Pierce Indian was on the corner of Fairview and San Gabriel avenues, next to that was Pierce’s home, where Munro lived from at least 1965-67.

Way back in their youth, Sam Pierce and Rollie Free worked for the same Indian dealership agent in Kansas City

Pierce combed the U.S. for parts. He bought out the stocks of numerous dealers who once sold and serviced the great red machines.

Burt Munro : The Lost Interviews

11 people were injured and hospitalized as idiot in a Porsche forgets just why people in Mustangs are dumbasses when leaving a Cars and Coffee….. and duplicates the jackass attempt at showing off. Learn how to do a burnout you idiots!

September 17th, 2017 by admin

You can see on the road that several tires were smoked leaving the car show… and that this dumbass was richer than he was talented at driving.

His insurance company? Never ever going to give him a policy again

The incident happened about 11 a.m. Saturday as two events took place at the Boise Spectrum Cars and Coffee weekly Saturday meet

Justin King said he heard the crash and immediately rushed to the scene. “You could hear the screaming,” he told the AP. “There were people’s shoes that went flying. There was at least one youngster, less than 10, he was kind of unconscious.”

King said 400 or 500 vehicles showed up for the car show and participants were peeling out for crowds who lined up outside the event to watch. “People like to show off when they leave these events,” he said.


https://www.cbsnews.com/news/boise-idaho-car-plows-into-crowd-several-injured/
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/09/16/car-crashes-into-crowd-idaho-car-show-injures-11/673848001/

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11 people were injured and hospitalized as idiot in a Porsche forgets just why people in Mustangs are dumbasses when leaving a Cars and Coffee….. and duplicates the jackass attempt at showing off. Learn how to do a burnout you idiots!

the Alfa Romeo Tipo 158

September 1st, 2017 by admin

the Alfa Tipo B that made its first appearance in 1932. Between then and 1934, it won every grand prix in which it was entered, driven by the likes of Rudolf Caracciola and the great Tazio Nuvolari, who many rate as the greatest driver of all time. In 1933, Alfa Romeo was nationalized and officially withdrew from the sport, although Ferrari continued to field the cars on a semi-works basis.

Even against the might of the emerging German marques such as Mercedes and Auto Union, Nuvolari managed some mighty feats with the Tipo B, none better than his win in the 1935 German Grand Prix.

Alfa took full control of its racing programme again in 1938, but the war intervened. Put off by the German dominance of grand prix racing in the late 1930s, Gioacchino Columbo designed an Alfa Romeo Tipo 158 for the smaller voiturette class in 1939.

Legend has it that three Alfettas spent the war hidden in a cheese factory in northern Italy while the Germans occupied Italy, but were subsequently brought out in 1946 and under the new, pragmatic postwar regulations it automatically became a grand prix car and dominated the scene for the remainder of the 1940s. Alfa Romeo enjoyed a string of 26 unbroken wins.

By 1951, some 13 years after it was designed, the supercharged car, now in 159 guise, took Juan Manuel Fangio to his first world title in the final race of the season, the Spanish Grand Prix, in a shoot-out against the Ferraris of Alberto Ascari, Froilan Gonzalez and Piero Taruffi. It was the car’s last race and Alfa Romeo then turned its attention to sports car racing.

http://en.espn.co.uk/alfaromeo/motorsport/team/290.html

The moment the flag fell to mark the beginning of the first ever F1 World Championship race on May 13th 1950 at Silverstone there was little doubt what car would cross the finish line first. Four Alfa Romeo 158s lined up ahead of all others thus continuing their 3 year long domination. One Alfetta (which means ‘Little Alfa’ in Italian because of its compact dimensions) retired during the race but the others finished 1-2-3 and left their nearest opponent 2 laps behind.

What is most incredible is that this car was already a 13-year-old design. When the new German Nazi government decided to go motor racing it did so with remarkable funds, technology and people. Other nations’ manufacturers couldn’t keep up with these newly set standards. Italy, keen to stay at the forefront of at least one aspect of motor racing turned its back to Grand prix cars and decided to build cars for the Voiturette class. ‘Voiturette’ or, in Italian, ‘Veturetta’ was considered a ‘step-down’ class similar to Formula 2 or Formula 3000 of today. Gioacchino Colombo designed a new Alfa Romeo 158 (‘15’ for 1,500cc and ‘8’ for 8 cylinders) on behalf of Alfa Romeo and its chief Orazio Satta.

Its straight-eight supercharged engine produced nearly 200bhp at 7,000rpm. It had a single-stage Roots supercharger with 17.6psi boost and twin overhead camshafts. The engine block was cast in Elektron (magnesium) and what was unusual for that time, it consisted of two separate castings integrated with a common head. The sump and crankcase were cast with identical material. The crankshaft was chrome nickel steel and the whole engine weighed only 363lb

1951 saw the Alfa Romeo’s first major defeat since 1939 when Froilan Gonzalez drove a Ferrari 375 to victory in British GP at Silverstone. The 27-race-long winning streak had ended. Ferrari’s won 2 more races that year but Alfa Romeo’s Fangio managed to claim the World Championship at last race of the season. There Alfa brought the 159M (Maggiorata = increased) cars with reinforced frame tubes and cantilevers above both frame rails.

By then, Alfa’s fuel consumption, thanks to ever-increasing supercharger pressure and rpms, had fallen to 1.7mpg (170liters/100km)! The cars needed 2 or 3 refueling stops to complete a race distance while the 4.5-liter unsupercharged competition could run virtually non-stop. The engines were thermally stressed to such a degree that a so called ‘fifth stroke’ was needed. This required that some amount of unburned fuel was needed to be run through the cylinders just to cool them down a bit.

The cars had reached the limit of their development and with not enough funds to build a completely new car Alfa Romeo was forced to withdraw from racing and thus the incredible story of these cars came to an end.

http://www.grandprixhistory.org/alfa158.htm

In late December 1942, after the bombing of Italian cities had started but had not yet targeted the Alfa factory, the removal of strategic documents and departments commenced. The Air Force spent 10 million, later extended to 30, to move the offices and workshops. The Design and Experimental Department was the first moved to a safe place, joined by the technical archives. They were installed at Orta, on a lake of the same name, located west of the Major Lake.

A few kilometres away, in a hilly north-eastern location called Armeno, were transferred the experimental workshops, where the parts for the AR 1101 28 cylinder were built. Ing. Gatti, transferred from Naples to Armeno with his staff, as there was no space left in Orta; he recalls they were housed in a knife factory called Inuggi.

They first worked on aeroplanes projects, then switched to the famous stoves and other postwar transition products. The transfer to and supply of the new locations was very difficult for both the material and the workers. The nuts and bolts production was moved to Vanzago (west of Milan, not far from Arese) and the auxiliary production together with metallurgic and chemical laboratories to Melzo, east of Milan, not far from Gorgonzola.

whoa, a history lesson all laid out of the time a penniless race team handed Shelby and his highly funded Toyota racing team a smack down defeat

August 27th, 2017 by admin

grab the Aug 21st 2017 issue of Autoweek, and flip to pages 10-13

Hino started out making cars and trucks, which caught the attention of a guy named Dunham, who pointed out that to succeed big, they’d need to win some races, in America. This would open the US market, and then they’d get a foothold where they could sell serious numbers of vehicles

Dunham met Peter Brock, and BRE was making the Hino competitive. The 1st season the Dunham raced it, the 2nd season Brock raced it, and made some podiums, enough to impress Hino. They then sourced bigger engines, and in 1966 Brock and Dunham take the 1st and 2nd places in the Mission Bell 100 in Riverside –

Unicorns DO exist. I found one. A beautiful young woman who went out and bought a cool old car for no other reason than she loves old cars. Meet Chris, and her ‘72 Maverick, Holly

August 22nd, 2017 by admin

If Holly wasn’t your first choice, what was and why?

My first choice was not a Maverick, I had no idea this car actually existed. But I’ll get into that later. My dream car was a Chevy Nova. I was a freshman in high school and one day I was getting on the bus after school and when I looked out the window there it was. A shiny chrome silver. 5 star rims and two black stripes down the back. I was completely in love and I searched it quick before the bus took off for its name/model anything that could tell me what I had just fallen in love with. On the grill I saw the letters SS and on the side in the nicest font I’d ever seen on a car was the word Nova. I googled it as soon as I got home and from that day on I would tell everyone I was going to buy a Nova.

How did that hunt for that car go, and will you try for that car again someday?

Stored for 40 years, only has 550 miles on it, and only sold at auction for 17,600 thou. Was it worth the effort to store it for such a low return after 4 decades of not enjoying it?

August 21st, 2017 by admin

It still has air of 1977 in the tires. These pace cars were hard to sell new, and nothing has changed.

Dream Factory Blow, a company in Japan that can make a stock vanilla van or truck look like a classic (Thanks Burkey!)

August 18th, 2017 by admin

they manufacture high quality plastic kits to transform A Honda van into a 70’s Dodge van, amongst others.

http://www.blow-net.co.jp/products-cars

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Dream Factory Blow, a company in Japan that can make a stock vanilla van or truck look like a classic (Thanks Burkey!)

Might be a mafia dumping area, a pond 20 feet deep was found to be hiding one car, and many barrels, on the bottom. A body was found in the car… no word yet on if there are body parts in the barrels.

August 17th, 2017 by admin

On Aug. 15, divers contracted by Michigan Department of Transportation to clear a pond of barrels of unknown origin found what seems to be a 73 Buick Electra 225 with human remains inside at the waters’ bottom.

By the week’s end, forensic scientists will examine the remains to determine who the person was, police said.

The man-made, 20-foot-deep pond is located between I-75 and Saginaw Auto Recyclers.

It was created sometime during the construction of the nearby Zilwaukee Bridge, said MDOT spokesperson Jocelyn Hall. That time frame places the pond as being built between 1979 and 1988.

http://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw/index.ssf/2017/08/what_we_know_so_far_about_huma.html
http://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw/index.ssf/2017/08/epa_finds_body_in_car_in_botto.html

this makes the 4th car I’ve posted about that was found underwater with a body in it…

A 69 Coronet was pulled out of a Florida canal, two teens went off a road after a concert in 78.
A lake in Oklahoma had a couple cars pulled out, both had simply went straight instead of around the corner, a 69 Camaro and a 55 Chev, bodies still inside.
And a 68 Catalina missing since 72 in a fishing lake in North Carolina

http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/2015/07/42-year-old-missing-persons-case-solved.html

http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/2013/09/two-cars-found-in-lake-may-have-been.html
http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/2015/01/newsflash-surprise-find-in-florida.html

See more here:
Might be a mafia dumping area, a pond 20 feet deep was found to be hiding one car, and many barrels, on the bottom. A body was found in the car… no word yet on if there are body parts in the barrels.

I was emailed by a car model maker who wanted to know about the Howard Hughes Duesenburg he modified to tow gliders, and learned he has the only 1958 Moskvitch in the USA, and wow, what a story

August 11th, 2017 by admin

a retiring sea captain bought a 1958 Moskvitch in Amsterdam, and had it shipped to Los Angeles, where the customs guys bounced it right back… nothing was SAE approved… no lights, electrical, or glass.

But when some Mongo went to forklift it back onto the ship, both forks went into the doors.

Maybe it was a reaction to the Sputnik fear. Who knows.

But the car was taken to a repair shop in Ensenada before the ship headed back to return the car to point of origin, and was going to get the doors fixed.

But it was stolen, and driven into LA. Yeah, complete opposite of what happens to cars in LA, when stolen, and taken to Tijuana.

It was stripped and abandoned in LA, and the cops impounded the hulk, and it went to a junkyard. The junkyard operator thought it was kinda neat, got it running (remember, it was barely ever used since being bought) and when some DMV employee friend asked to borrow a car, and this was the best option in the junkyard, the DMV guy got some paperwork to make the car legal.

Later, another acquaintence in AAA did a paperwork trick to make the car legal, and the Moskvitch was suddenly a legit California titled car.

So it was occassionally used as a backup or loaner car, but as years passed, it sat in the junkyard and rusted. Just hanging out in a corner. Until the junkyard was finally closed as the operator retired, and moved to Hemet (between Riverside and San Diego on the I 15) when it was finally put up for sale in the newspaper.

Then it was finally acquired by Gary, who took it with him when transferred to a new job in Texas, and diligently restored it, even when it was part of a sudden disappearance of all the cars in the paint shop as the owner went out of business, and was found miles away in a barn… and then finally Gary took it to car shows. Such as the one on an Air Force base… where someone freaked out that Gary may have mentioned he was in frequent contact with a parts supplier of communist political affiliation (this was the 80s and cold war paranoia was nuts, just look at the goofy movies we made about that whole era) and the FBI stopped by to ask some questions.

Obviously, the FBI agents realized what a gaffe had been made, laughed it off, and Gary has continued to bring his 1958 Russian car to concours condition the hard way in the many years since 1981.

And since I’m in a hurry to tell you this story instead of waiting for him to email me some photos, I’ll just post this right now. Photos to come later, I hope.

https://www.ttnut.com/russian-american-cars-and-trucks-anyways-t1099-40.html
https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2012/02/19/sia-flashback-auto-adventures-in-a-son-of-moscow/

Here is the original:
I was emailed by a car model maker who wanted to know about the Howard Hughes Duesenburg he modified to tow gliders, and learned he has the only 1958 Moskvitch in the USA, and wow, what a story