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Tags » ‘custom’

the Cadillac Maharani of 1956, a series 60 Special, had a kitchen sink, refrigerator, toaster, folding table, cutlery drawer, coffee and water dispensers, hot plate and a small safe. Upholstered in snake skin patterned satin with mouton fur rugs.

September 13th, 2017 by admin

Original post: 
the Cadillac Maharani of 1956, a series 60 Special, had a kitchen sink, refrigerator, toaster, folding table, cutlery drawer, coffee and water dispensers, hot plate and a small safe. Upholstered in snake skin patterned satin with mouton fur rugs.

The Berlin Buick. A very nice bug. How they don’t roast when driving from the engine heat I’ve no idea

September 12th, 2017 by admin

The “Berlin Buick,” as it’s called, started life as a 1956 Volkswagen Beetle. The motor is a 1961, 215 cubic inch aluminum block, fuel injected Buick V-8 engine which is mounted inside the passenger compartment where the rear seat would have originally been located.

This 1956 Volkswagen Beetle called “Berlin Buick” was built by Browns Metal Mods in New York.

At the recent Syracuse Nationals Hot Rod and Custom Car Show, the car was selected as a winner and hi-lighted in the prestigious Designers Dozen display.

The original concept of this VW-Buick combination is a long time dream of Rob Freeman from Watertown, who is the owner and designer. Mr. Freeman selected Brown’s Metal Mods to build this unique vehicle because of their notoriety, engineering and fabrication skills. The vehicle was constructed over a two year period and made its second showing at Syracuse in front of 100,000 spectators. The car’s two tone paint colors are tonic brown and ginger beer.

The Beetle uses a reinforced pan and rides on a custom independent suspension with RideTech air shocks. A custom tube chassis supports an all-aluminum Buick 215 V8 that produces 250-275 horsepower with a Hilborn injection stack and exhausts through straight headers that exit under the rear windows.

running the autocross at Columbus.

John Jackson of Not Stock Photography.

https://www.facebook.com/brownsmetalmodsny/
http://www.hotrod.com/articles/the-top-winners-in-the-2017-hot-august-nights-cup-contest/
https://www.engineswapdepot.com/?p=17024
http://www.journalandrepublican.com/ljr01/browns-metal-mods-receive-national-recognition-20170720?gallerydate=2017-07-16Z

Continued here:
The Berlin Buick. A very nice bug. How they don’t roast when driving from the engine heat I’ve no idea

for some people motivation can be very different. Making yourself unhireable to common companies by tatting your face, neck and head, is one way to insure you’ll succeed on your own, according to Gary Queen

August 6th, 2017 by admin

Finding that most people won’t train anyone to do good work as a job security principle, meant learning their jobs off the clock, so he went to work when the 1st guy got there everyday, 530, and learned his job before his own shift started at 8

He got his start in custom painting at collision repair shops in Austin. He learned the trade from the ground up. His job was taping off cars before they were painted, but he would come into the shop hours ahead of his shift to learn the other guys’ jobs. It was the only way to break out of the dead end job of taping.

His boss at the time told him he didn’t want to teach him how to airbrush because he was afraid Queen would take his job. So Queen bought an airbrush and practiced in his garage. Over one weekend, he painted his truck.

“I pulled my truck next to his truck on Monday morning. My truck whooped his truck’s ass. I said, thanks for not teaching me how to paint. You were my motivation,” says Queen.

Queen worked his way up to a Lexus dealership, doing the repainting after collision repairs, but his tattoos got him in trouble with the boss, so he quit.

“When I opened my own shop, I had one tattoo on the back of my neck. I said, ‘If I put tattoos on my head I’m going to make it to where nobody will hire me; that will make me have to work harder at my own business,’” says Queen.

Queen switched from airbrushing to run his growing business, and hired two full-time airbrush artists, Mike Cissell and Tim Murphy. Both used to work at American IronHorse, a now defunct custom motorcycle manufacturer and Murphy is a trained artist who went to art school in Boston.

Murphy had a 20-year career as a custom engraver but said the work became physically painful, clutching tools day after day. He wanted to be an airbrush artist so after moving to Texas, he began working for American IronHorse. When it closed down, he came over to Other Side Customs.

Cissell had been a muralist and was doing airbrushing side jobs for friends, eventually building up a customer base. At one point he opened a mixed-use space so he could operate a gallery and give airbrush lessons in addition to his custom paint work, but had to shut it down because the city hassled him about the ceiling, not having separate bathrooms for each gender and not having enough ventilation.

http://www.dallasobserver.com/arts/inside-other-side-customs-where-people-pay-10-000-to-get-their-motorcycles-painted-8500332

Read the original here: 
for some people motivation can be very different. Making yourself unhireable to common companies by tatting your face, neck and head, is one way to insure you’ll succeed on your own, according to Gary Queen

Wolfgang Schmidt of Germany’s W&W Cycles, in 2008, led an epic motorcycle expedition along the Mackenzie Ice Road in Canada’s Northwest Territories during the dead of winter, to prove a point, and the reliability of aftermarket parts

July 2nd, 2017 by admin

To understand why someone would want to ride their motorcycle under such harsh and extreme conditions, you have to go back to a 1990’s Harley-Davidson advertising campaign that implored riders to use original spare parts if they wanted a reliable ride.

Choosing to view that assertion as a challenge, the folks at W and W Cycles decided to prove that it’s actually the other way around… that aftermarket parts were just as good, if not better, when it came to reliability. And to test this theory out, Wolfgang and his team rebuilt two bikes — a 1948 Panhead and a 2006 W and W Custom Shovelhead — and took them for the long cold ride.

Wolfgang used Performance Machines wheels and brakes on the journey through the Canadian Arctic.


http://www.custommotorcyclepartsblog.com/ice-road-bikers-use-pm-parts/pm_ice_gasstation/
https://www.facebook.com/bigislandchopper/posts/1809253739101632

See original here:
Wolfgang Schmidt of Germany’s W&W Cycles, in 2008, led an epic motorcycle expedition along the Mackenzie Ice Road in Canada’s Northwest Territories during the dead of winter, to prove a point, and the reliability of aftermarket parts

crazy custom high 5 to Neil in Detroit, for sharing his build on the Samba

June 20th, 2017 by admin

For a fast article that spells it out without a typical forum style build with a thousand interruptions by admirers, see

Bill Carter, you may not know the name, but you’ve seen his work become famous, and the influence spread far from who inspired him, and who he inspired

May 13th, 2017 by admin

Bill began his career as a youngster painting a 1956 Buick that he striped in a garage and would eventually paint everything from Airplanes to Wheelstanders.

One day while on a sidewalk waiting to be picked up from the movies Larry Watson rolled by in his 50 Chevy, and Bill was floored by the whole thing, the car, the paint, and the pompadour.

He was inspired by Larry Watson in a couple of other ways too, the painting of candy, lace, and style… and taking on bit roles on tv and movies.

Bill became the protégé of Larry Watson after working around town but being too shy to ask Larry for a job, and is the only person known to have the secret formulas to iconic Watson paint jobs memorized. It was Larry Watson who coined the nickname “Wild Bill” because Bill would not only paint dragsters but race them.

Starting at the bottom, working on the side at home and doing beer trucks, paint, lettering etc, he was suddenly screwed when the union went on strike at the beer factories, so he went to work in a production company across the street from Disney. (1964-65). Suddenly making 3 times the money as an employee instead of self employed, and in the right place at the right time when Larry Watson walked into the shop and offered him a job based on the great work he had seen around town that Bill had done.

But they didn’t get along, and the job was a grind. So, he went out on his own and started his own company, Custom Candy by Carter. About that time he got hooked on driving top fuel dragsters too. (1969)

By the late 60’s Walt the “Kid Striper” had grown up and teamed up Bill Carter at Carter Pro Paint on Burbank Boulevard.

Walt was Bill’s pinstripe expert, and the word grew that Walt was definitely the go-to guy for custom striping. At the time, Bill would also take under his wing a 12-year-old worker by the name of Mario Gomez, who handled the broom duties at the shop, and in years down the road, the friendship between them would bring about the Candy Factory.

Walt went on to do the paint on Gypsy Rose, the most famous lowrider Impala ever.

He painted the Wagonmaster for the guy who bought it from Tommy Ivo, met Don Prudhomme, and began painting for Don, who introduced him to Tony Nancy, etc etc the ball was rolling and he painted Joe Piasano’s fueler, and Dick Landy’s cars, then Pennzoil wanted their Indy cars and team rig all pearl yellow.

Suddenly Hollywood was knocking at the shop door and he was painting Linda Vaughn’s Ferrari, Fleetwood Mac’s cars, Leslie Neilson, Dan Haggerty’s (Grizzly Adams) Porsche, etc.

Today, Wild Bill Carter is sought out for striping, overlays, pearl bases, candy overlays and color arrangements which are is key factors on custom paint job and he is the go to guy for wild 60s paint schemes.

So Prudhomme set about getting the Shelby Super Snake restored. But that took a longer time than he was used to. Don Long, the original builder, did the chassis. “Wild” Bill Carter painted the body.

“He’s in a walker, a f****** walker, and he insists on doing the painting himself,” said Prudhomme of Carter. “He does a few swipes, moves the walker, does a few more swipes…”

http://autoweek.com/article/car-life/don-snake-prudhomme-brings-back-shelby-super-snake
https://www.facebook.com/SnakeRacing712/posts/883774785023613
https://www.facebook.com/SnakeRacing712/photos/a.828113817256377.1073741829.161884967212602/883208825080209/?type=3
http://www.customcarchronicle.com/custom-cars/howard-gribble-collection-part-2/
http://rodzbackalley.blogspot.com/2015/03/legendary-custom-paint-icon-wild-bill.html

http://www.bikernet.com/pages/BIKERNET_SUPREME_BRENT_AND_KIYO_KNUCKLE_FEATURE.aspx

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Bill Carter, you may not know the name, but you’ve seen his work become famous, and the influence spread far from who inspired him, and who he inspired

All right then… lemme just toss this out there

April 27th, 2017 by admin

Originally posted here: 
All right then… lemme just toss this out there

board track inspired HD made by Veroland at Kickasschoppers near Jakarta

March 10th, 2017 by admin

http://fueltank.cc/blog/kickass-harley-evo

Photography by Luke Ray (he is damn good)

seen in this video too, starting at the 1:45 minute

See the original post: 
board track inspired HD made by Veroland at Kickasschoppers near Jakarta

the GT 51, a much better gallery than the one I took at SEMA

February 5th, 2017 by admin

See the rest here: 
the GT 51, a much better gallery than the one I took at SEMA

Striped by Larry Watson, leaded by Bill Hines

February 2nd, 2017 by admin

May 1998 issue of Custom Rodder mangazine

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Striped by Larry Watson, leaded by Bill Hines