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Tags » ‘engine’

under the hood

August 9th, 2017 by admin

In the 70s, the car was fitted with a genuine 1970 NASCAR 426ci Hemi by its previous owner, who at the time worked for Ray Nichels – former head of Chrysler’s NASCAR program.

While the engine’s original intake is no longer fitted, it retains the genuine X-Code Chrysler Racing block and heads, and now runs a single 1050cfm Holley carb and direct-port nitrous system.

https://www.streetmachine.com.au/events/1707/motorex-2017-our-10-favourite-rides-gallery

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under the hood

the fire that melted off the wing of a 767 last October at O’Hare airport resulted in an NTSB report that took 12 months to get released to the public. Do they think we’ll forget if they delay long enough?

July 7th, 2017 by admin

It took at least a minute from the time the plane stopped until the copilot reported shutting off fuel to the engines, according to a transcript of the cockpit’s voice recorder. (That’s a big damn problem when some idiot doesn’t understand fire 101, turn off the damn jet fuel pumps immediately!)

What was learned? Pilots aren’t able to be yelled at from the cabin, there’s no way to shut off the engines from the cabin in order to deploy the emergency exit chutes, and it’s obvious that locking the door to the pilots will cause big damn problems in similar emergencies like this when the engines catch the plane on fire, and the pilots and cabin crew can’t prioritize, because they are trying to follow checklists.

Pilots told investigators that it took a long time to depressurize the cabin, which was required in the evacuation checklist before shutting off the engine and ordering an evacuation. The captain described the checklist as “cumbersome.”

Sully proved why a good pilot should do the right thing, not the checklist, in an emergency

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-ntsb-report-ohare-runway-fire-20170706-story.html

After the past 6 months of horrible airline treatment of passengers, it’s no wonder why this report was delayed. Airlines didn’t want a dogpile of bad publicity preventing people from flying. Those planes have to keep on schedule whether full or empty, and if they are all empty, they’re losing money at a rapid rate for the airlines, which go out of business. If the airlines fail, airports fail. When airlines, and aiports fail, the govt will bleed red ink like mad, and quickly learn the cost of a failed system that the govt will have to prop up with ridiculous amounts of money.

Here’s the info from the report, keep in mind, the plane was moving at 154mph when the engine broke apart

According to the NTSB, passengers said they heard a loud bang during takeoff and the aircraft wobbled. Flames were detected almost immediately. Passengers moved from the right side of the plane to the left, shouting at flight attendants to open emergency doors as the plane came to a halt and the cabin filled with smoke. The effort to evacuate the plane was hindered by the undamaged engine still running.

One passenger told investigators he could see flames coming from the right wing and windows on that side of the aircraft began to crack. He said the crew was telling passengers to stay in their seats, and thinking that was odd because the right side of the plane was in flames.

“He stated the only thing to do was get out of the airplane fast, which he did,” the NTSB reported.

The passenger said he opened a left exit hatch, climbed on the wing and tumbled down the slide, resulting in an injury. He said he stood up to get away from the plane and was blown over by the thrust of the still-running left engine.

Flight attendants said they weren’t able to contact the cockpit to coordinate the evacuation with the pilots. Passengers had begun racing to the left side of the plane even before it stopped on the runway. Some people insisted on trying to bring their bags with them despite repeated calls to leave them by flight attendants.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-07-06/ntsb-details-chaotic-evacuation-of-fiery-american-airlines-jet
http://www.nbcchicago.com/investigations/NTSB-Details-Chaos-Panic-on-Burning-American-Airlines-Jet-at-OHare-Last-Fall-432997143.html

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the fire that melted off the wing of a 767 last October at O’Hare airport resulted in an NTSB report that took 12 months to get released to the public. Do they think we’ll forget if they delay long enough?

Original owner still has it, still says he will get to fixing it up someday. Sure you will, just make sure when you die it’s not going to the county because you didn’t include it in a will.

July 4th, 2017 by admin

if you don’t immediately know what this is, well, the hood scoop alone is enough to tell you the engine is a 440 six pack. The sides of the car? They are enough to tell you it’s a Plymouth Road Runner. That makes this a 1969 A12 optioned car. Rare, and worth about 80 thou restored, and about 50 thou as is. Maybe more if the buyer wants the garage dust and original unrestored patina.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/269094939877040/permalink/1110676725718853/

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Original owner still has it, still says he will get to fixing it up someday. Sure you will, just make sure when you die it’s not going to the county because you didn’t include it in a will.

Behind this ordinary wall, inside a one bedroom apartment, a 1959 Ferrari 250GT PF Coupe was stored for 30 years in Hollywood. Look carefully, see the cracks in the wall? It’s a hidden door with hinges

January 31st, 2017 by admin

That window above, is the same window over the roof of the Ferrari

The apartment building owner bought the 250 GT in the 70s, enjoyed it for about 7 years, then decided to restore it, and needed a place for it to be out of sight and off the street while the engine was being rebuilt by the shop at Briggs Cunningham’s museum.

So he cut out the wall and installed hinges for it’s eventual return to the outside world, then rolled the car in, put the ramps in the apartment with the car, closed the wall, and with a fast coat of stucco and paint, instant – presto – chango…. the neighbors never realized the apartment was now a storage garage for a Ferrari.

It was on the first floor in a one-bedroom apartment, against the dining room wall facing the driveway. What the building owner had accomplished was inspired by a comic book strip, included that in the binder of documents with the Ferrari paperwork.

He hinged the hole in the wall so it’s a whole wall with a window and blinds and everything. It swings open, and he lined up ramps and rolled the car in. Later he took the engine and transmission out, and took the wheels off.

To get the car out they had the door cut open, swung the wall out and the hinge system thankfully still functioned. They used the same ramps that were used to put the car inside, lined them up, and had about five people pushing the car out.

The tire pressure was intentionally getting the car out so the car wouldn’t easily roll away as the brakes are non-operational. The whole process took around five hours.

http://petrolicious.com/apartment-find-this-ferrari-250-gt-pf-coupe-was-hidden-in-hollywood-for-decades

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Behind this ordinary wall, inside a one bedroom apartment, a 1959 Ferrari 250GT PF Coupe was stored for 30 years in Hollywood. Look carefully, see the cracks in the wall? It’s a hidden door with hinges

SCCA Trans Am Boss 302 mods by Kar Kraft

December 22nd, 2016 by admin

The first step in Kar Kraft’s chassis preparation was minimising weight. Even though the SCCA rule book for the ’69 Trans-Am series specified a minimum weight of 2900 lbs for Group II 5.0 litre cars, the aim was to build the cars as light as possible and then bring them up to meet the minimum weight limit.

This was done by securing lead or steel ballast down low at various key points in the chassis, to move the car’s standard 55.9% front v 44.1% rear weight distribution nearer to the ideal 50/50 split.

This process of moving weight rearward was further enhanced by relocating the battery from the engine bay to the boot and discreetly lowering the engine by around 50mm and moving it back as far as the firewall would allow.

57-58 Chevy Accessory Flame Out Vacuum Ash Tray

May 21st, 2016 by admin

The cannister jar was connected to engine vaccuum in the engine bay, and the lower right gadget was near the ashtray… it sucked the ashes off your cigarette when you pushed a button.

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57-58 Chevy Accessory Flame Out Vacuum Ash Tray

cool AMX at the Edelbrock annual car show and charity fundraiser, it happens to belong to an Edelbrock employee

May 18th, 2016 by admin

one of 5 of Dennis Allen’s AMX collection, and the one Edelbrock used the engine as a test mule, building it out to a 401 from a 390, a stroker with Carillo rods and JE Pistons, and Edelbrock Performer RPM aluminum heads (of course!). The little AMX mill was used it to develop the Air-Gap intake, and in fact, Allen’s 401 was even used to help develop the Pro-Flo EFI system.

SCCA undefeated Jaguar D Type, sold to a high school student who took it to Bonneville, and went 185 mph, fastest D Type ever at B-ville

April 26th, 2016 by admin

Supplied to Hoffman, USA; 2nd owner Briggs Cunningham race team, who, with Walt Hansgen driving, won SCCA C-Modified Championships in 1956 and 1957. It was then sold to Thomas Rutherford (Massachusetts) who upped the engine to a 3.8 engine, went with a long legged 2.53 axle, disc-type wheels and exhaust exiting at rear, took it to Bonneville where car achieved speed of 185.47mph, the highest officially recorded by a D-type. A record that held for 55 years.

It didn’t do much after that, except survive a tornado, and the Firestones from 1960 are still on it.

It sold for 1,815,000 at 2005 Monterey

a bike story with a Steve McQueen connection, that I’ve never even heard of before… Ol White, the bike that was replicated for Steve McQueen’s movie, the Blob

October 19th, 2015 by admin

In 1970 Doug Cameron set out to build a bike that no other Harley or Indian could beat. He crafted the bike with all the speed equipment and ingenuity of the day. The cylinder was punched out to 86 cu in, the engine was balanced, and a larger main sprocket.

It started out as a hard-tail 1936 Indian frame, with a ‘48 Indian front. The thing people notice first is the shifter, an actual WWII bayonette. The spring connected to the scabbard is the brake pedal return spring.

The spark plugs on the bars next to the horn are connected to the mag, and are a “visual tachometer” sparking away as the engine runs. “You get to a hundred or so and it’s like a blue flame shooting out of there.”

This bike is actually the “model” for Steve’s “The Blob” bike (named after his first movie).

Duntov’s test mule

September 16th, 2015 by admin

This one-off white-on-red 1954 Corvette is referred to as the ‘Mule Car’ due to the fact that Zora Duntov himself used it to develop the performance capacities of future Corvettes. Smokey Yunick, built the engine.

http://www.highline-autos.com/great_garage/53/The-Lingenfelter-Collection–Well-Engineered

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Duntov’s test mule