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Tags » ‘history’

In 1915, journalist Emily Post set out from New York to investigate whether it was possible to drive comfortably across the country to San Francisco in an automobile. 7 years later she wrote her book on etiquette

May 15th, 2017 by admin

Emily Post began her career as a writer at the age of thirty-one. Her romantic stories of European and American society were serialized in Vanity Fair, Collier’s, McCall’s, and other popular magazines. Many were also successfully published in book form.

Originally published by Collier’s Weekly, By Motor To The Golden Gate describes her travels with her cousin Alice and her son as she embarks on the 27-day car trip across America, complete with the elements that make any road trip memorable: the nauseating climbs along muddy roads, the elegance of stylish downtown hotels and the “eccentric topsy-turviness” of Midwestern cities.

The horse got a well deserved ride back down the hill after pulling the trolley up the hill in 1890

May 9th, 2017 by admin

Tracks laid on a sloping street required the horse to pull the trolley up to the end of the line.

The the horse is unhitched and catches a ride either on the trolley or a trailer cart and then the trolley is allowed to make the return run down the hill using gravity and the braking system on the car

https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelryerson/28430767185/

Originally posted here: 
The horse got a well deserved ride back down the hill after pulling the trolley up the hill in 1890

The 1929 Los Angeles Auto Show went up in flames, destroying 320 cars. Was it arson by the car junkyard next to it?

March 21st, 2017 by admin

There happened to be an auto salvage business on the adjoining lot, and after the fire, they simply took down a portion of the fence and dragged the burned-out cars into the salvage yard.

Does it now seem suspicious that there was a car fire at an autoshow of vehicles that weren’t running

http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=4645771&postcount=733

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The 1929 Los Angeles Auto Show went up in flames, destroying 320 cars. Was it arson by the car junkyard next to it?

Some cars are known for a variety of things, and others, for just one. The 1971 Dodge 3700GT of Spain is known for being blown up during a 1973 assassination

March 14th, 2017 by admin

The political career of Luis Carrero Blanco reached its zenith in June 1973 upon being named the Prime Minister of Spain and made a top deputy to Franco.

It seemed he would succeed the ailing dictator.

6 months later the seperatist group ETA (Basque community left wingers) supplied by the USA military with explosives, bombed the road from the church he attended mass at.

The car was instantly regarded as armored, but it isn’t, for it’s remarkable rugged endurance of the explosion… the left turn signal still works. 100Kg of dynamite, and several anti tank grenades, exploded under it. 2 of the 3 occupants survived the initial blast, for a little while.

The car was lifted over 20meters off the round

http://www.escuderia.com/dodge-3700gt-carrero-blanco-finalmente-expuesto/
http://www.pruebas.pieldetoro.net/web/pruebas/ver.php?ID=14
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basques

this is what it looked like before the bomb.

http://clasicosreina.blogspot.com/p/dodge-3700gt-ano-1973.html

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Some cars are known for a variety of things, and others, for just one. The 1971 Dodge 3700GT of Spain is known for being blown up during a 1973 assassination

A movie film recorded 4 days before the 1906 San Francisco disaster, from the front of a streetcar during filming on Market Street from 8th, in front of the Miles Studios, to the Ferry building. Your coffee and donuts morning video

March 10th, 2017 by admin

thanks Jeff!

From the you tube video notes:

The origin of the film was an enigma for many decades, and it was long thought to have been shot in September of 1905, after being dated as such by the Library of Congress based on the state of construction of several buildings. However, in 2009 and 2010, film historian David Kiehn, co-founder of Niles Film Museum in Niles, California, dated the film to the spring of 1906 from automobile registrations and weather records. Kiehn eventually found promotional materials from the film’s original release and dated the film to April 14th, 1906, and finally gave credit to the filmmakers, the Miles Brothers.

Accuracy: Automobile sounds are all either Ford Model T, or Model A, which came out later, but which have similarly designed engines, and sound quite close to the various cars shown in the film. The horns are slightly inaccurate as mostly bulb horns were used at the time, but were substituted by the far more recognizable electric “oogaa” horns, which came out a couple years later. The streetcar sounds are actual San Francisco streetcars. Doppler effect was used to align the sounds.

Here is the original:
A movie film recorded 4 days before the 1906 San Francisco disaster, from the front of a streetcar during filming on Market Street from 8th, in front of the Miles Studios, to the Ferry building. Your coffee and donuts morning video

33 cars who set out to tour New Zealand in January 1917, to survey the roads to get improvements made, only 10 made it

February 7th, 2017 by admin

100 people including MPs, Roads Board members, business managers, telegraph operators, photographers, an ambulance man, three land scouts, a biographer, and a handful of reporters were in 33 cars set out on the tour in January 1917.

Only 10 cars completed the journey, such were the Northland roads and conditions.

Yesterday they finished a centennial with 100 year old cars, and some people were in period correct costumes, and where possible they took the original route, but avoided areas where they would hold up traffic

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/northland-age/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503402&objectid=11786946

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33 cars who set out to tour New Zealand in January 1917, to survey the roads to get improvements made, only 10 made it

Lake Sawyer log dump train, 1920s

February 2nd, 2017 by admin

Originally posted here:
Lake Sawyer log dump train, 1920s

Can Am 50th Anniversary book review (one word, awesome)

December 15th, 2016 by admin

The Can Am was a racing series for 9 years, and they did a fantastic damn job of writing one chapter for each year.

There are so many cool things I learned, I can’t even figure out where to start… check the video (notice that WING? Biggest wing ever used)

and the smallest car, which should be compared to a go cart… it had 10 inch wheels, well, it was supposed to, but Firestone ran into problems and didn’t get them made in time. Regardless, the point was to make the smallest race car, for less aerodynamic drag, but… they forgot that the brakes would also be tiny, and that does NOT work well for racing.

When they did get the tires, they were really wide, and you know that tires if over inflated or spun really fast, are going to get stretch in the center… but if they aren’t designed well, and aren’t inflated enough, they only touch the ground above the outside edges of the rims…. that is a big problem too. So, basically they didn’t think this through very well.

Some cars were thought out very well, so much that they were quickly outlawed…. in a race that had been set up as “without rules” because ironically, the race series hadn’t been thought out very well. That is what makes this book invaluable to car guys that love the prime history of 60s racing… it is analytical about what made the race cars better, how they evolved (in cases like the Chaparral) and what was so overlooked, but obvious in hindsight, that was missed when they came up with the notion of unlimited racing.

One word: money. You can’t have unlimited racing, as only the unlimited funding from the largest corporations can compete, and whoever spends the most, wins. It’s not racing if it’s won by just spending the most money.

That is what nails this book for me, as the only book I’ll need to read on the subject of Can Am… it’s so damn thorough! Who won, why, how, and what caused failure. Both in the cars, and the race series itself. Brilliant writing direction that the author took, it’s on point for the reader that likes to learn, and for many people, we learned more about Trans Am racing, F1, Gran Prix, Rally, drag racing, or Nascar… and Can Am was something heard about, but not studied or learned very thoroughly. Then, the comparison of a lap time from one team to another, or year to the next, to show that this or that was advanced significantly, or not at all… that sort of analysis is great stuff to me…. to learn that the best driver that there ever was had a time, but the mediocre car was letting him down, or that the next years advances in engines or tires put him some seconds faster when little else changed. Terrific info.

for example

Vic Elford remembers: “My first impression was, I don’t really see it as very quick, because it just sort of goes around corners. But then of course, when it got down to analyzing it, we found it was going around corners about 12 or 15 percent quicker than anything else would.”

I sure as hell never learned about Can Am til now, but hell, I’d glimpsed so much about it from looking at the drivers, team owners, and hearing about the tracks that I wasn’t coming at this book without some knowledge of those aspects of it, and that is pretty damn cool. It’s a lot harder to enjoy a book where you have to learn about EVERYTHING, like the characters, locations, or whatever.

When it’s just another aspect of the history of so much you’ve heard of already, well… its a damn pleasure to get more info on all of the stuff involved. Tire technology, engine advancement with turbos and injection, wings and aero, and what part the famous racers played in the various teams in Can Am… as I never learned before about the teams, the drivers that were hired like movie stars to play a role, and just as quickly released for other racing venues (F1 for example) or the business aspect of running a teams in multiple race series (F1, Trans Am, Nascar for example) and the effect that had on owners or drivers.

There were only a couple minor things that bugged me, and that’s down to editting… for example, the info and photos about a car should be on the same pages, right? When the “sucker” car is discussed for 4 or 5 pages, but the photos are all 6 or 7 pages further down, for no reason I can see… that bugs me (pages 140-147) and pages 127 -134 are about the death of Bruce McLaren, but the photos are all about the “Shadow” which gets discussed after the photos were all used in the previous 7 pages. But that was the only quibble I had.

You’re going to see the striking excellence of three teams and it’s amazing, the Penske, the McLaren, and the Hall teams. That such a fantastic group of race car engineers and innovators all were vying for the incredible championship win money, it’s competition level was just absurdly high, and then you also had the drivers that were among the best in the world, Gurney, Hulme, Donohue, McLaren, Parnelli, Phil Hill, George Follmer, Peter Revson, Andretti, and Pedro Rodriguez to name a few.

https://www.facebook.com/CanAm50th/

You can see some of the book at

the Shell 4000 Cross Canada Rally in 1963, strangely, had a pair of Chrysler 300s in full rally race mode

October 7th, 2016 by admin

The Shell 4000 was the worlds longest, most grueling rally in the 60’s, and the only FIA sanctioned one in North America.

For the rally cars, Chrysler chose the 413 with 360 horsepower and a simple four barrel carb backed with the Torqueflite three speed automatic transmission. Both cars were two door hardtops and set up by Carl Prueths for rally racing with complete chassis protection using 3/4 inch welded steel plate on items deemed to be in danger including shock absorbers, engine oil pan, the K frame cradle, rear axle carrier and the leaf springs. A roof lamp was mounted providing high power wattage to light up the road ahead and help set up the car for turns. Even the tires and wheels were heavy duty. The 300 usually ran 14 inch rims with nice cushy road tires. These rally 300s came with 15 inch weld reinforced steel wheels with special 9.00x 15 inch Goodyear non expanding braced tread tires imported from Belgium.

The drivers were Gene Henderson with Fred Browne as navigator and the second car had Terry Sumner and Roger Bohl as navigator. Both cars were painted white with blue stripes in the center.

Starting in Vancouver, to Calgary, Regina, Winnepeg, along the north shore of Lake Superior, Chrysler proved that if soundly designed and properly equipped, even a Pentastar Panzer will be a competitive rally car..

http://phscollectorcarworld.blogspot.com/2015/01/road-rallying-1963-chrysler-300.html

The rally was annual from 1961 through 1968, then Shell ended it’s participation. A similar rally was held again in 1971, 1994, 95, and last in 1997. In 2009, Napa had a 500 mile rally.

That 1st rally even had a V12 Rolls Royce, and it weighed 7000 pounds

http://shell-4000-rally.org/4000_web/other/history.htm
http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/july-1967/36/rally-review-canadian-shell-4000-rally
https://revslib.stanford.edu/item/bh132jm2174

Continued here:
the Shell 4000 Cross Canada Rally in 1963, strangely, had a pair of Chrysler 300s in full rally race mode

side effect of prohibition, a borrowed Stutz touring car with a bootlegger driver, July 1924

August 26th, 2016 by admin

Originally posted here: 
side effect of prohibition, a borrowed Stutz touring car with a bootlegger driver, July 1924