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Tags » ‘texas’

The Exxon Mobil Historical Collection

February 8th, 2018 by admin

Someone gathered together the documents, photos, advertisements, etc from Standard Oil, Socony Mobil Oil, Vacuum Oil of

financing its municipal services from the pockets of unwary travelers…. aka the Selma Texas speedtrap of the early 70s

January 17th, 2018 by admin

Selma’s speed trap collected an esti­mated $168,000 a year, or more than $800 for every man, woman, and child who lived there. That’s 4 times more than even the state of Texas, as all the state taxes added up produced only $215 per Texan.

Despite their growing notoriety, Selma’s officials showed no signs of halting their lucrative operation. They even concealed the full extent of their activity by violating several Texas statutes, and, as Texas Monthly Magazine found, appearing prepared to wage a protracted legal battle to shield their municipal records from public scrutiny.

Located 16 miles outside San Antonio, along busy Interstate High­way 35, between Austin and San Antonio, next to Randolph AFB, Selma was perfectly situated for a speed trap, as the highway 1603 loop crosses the I 35 right on the town’s south city limit

Northbound travelers approach it over the crest of a long hill, at the bottom of which, under the 1603 highway bridge, cops had a speed trap

Created in 1964 under a wild west law that allowed for a fly by night hanging judge roadside courtroom type of town, Selma was carefully created to sidestep laws requiring oversight by the county and the state capital. Yes, seriously. It was founded back in 1847 as a stagecoach stop, and they picked up some legal loophole info along the century since

It was incorporated as a “general law” town under a statutory provision that permits as few as twenty people to map out some proposed town boundaries, allege that at least 200 people reside within them and petition county au­thorities to call an election. If the re­sulting vote favors incorporation, the new community is free to elect a mayor and aldermen, establish municipal ser­vices including a police department, and, if it wishes, set up a roadside courtroom to dispense its own brand of justice.

29 people signed the original petition to create Selma in 1964, 1/4 of them were all related, and the mayor was one of them.

The proposed city limits never extended more than a thou­sand feet from the highway, were 2 miles long, and may not have had many people to begin with, but no proof was required when getting incorporated, and 4 months later, Selma claimed to have over 600, which happened to be the minimum needed to qualify for title 28. A couple years later the census found only 207 people in city limits

The cops issued 500 tickets a month, they were for $35 for 65 in a 55. The common complaint about the Selma cops to the state attorney general was that the police add on an extra ten miles to the alleged speed, because the Selma prosecutor woudn’t prosecute drivers for going less than ten miles over the limit.

Failing to send a check for the speeding ticket, and then failing to appear in court, resulted in a 100 or 200 dollar “failure to appear” fine added on. Out of staters didn’t get the optional court visit to appeal, they could pay up, or post a bond. The court was only open one day a month, on a Tuesday, 1 pm. If they weren’t at the 1pm roll call, they forfeited the fine, if they were there, they’d have to wait outside all day, in Texas heat, or give up and pay at the handy window outside the court next to the line. If they did wait, they normally lost their case, and paid up anyway.

Then they ticketed the governor’s wife.

The result was House Bill 550 of the 1973 Legislature, which prohibited towns of less than 5000 population from using radar on Inter­state highways.

No one testified against it except a Selma police­man who unearthed a 1935 decision of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals holding unconstitutional a legislative re­quirement that policemen in cities over 10,000 population wear uniforms and badges when making arrests. Selma interpreted this decision to mean that it was “beyond the authority of the legislature” to regulate small-town speed traps

Of course a list of other Texas towns includes Webster (pop. 3250), between Houston and Galveston in the NASA area. “A notorious one oyer the years,” according to a spokesman for the Ameri­can Automobile Association. There are frequent complaints that Webster’s speeding arrests tend to escalate into DWI charges. The town is currently under investigation by the U.S. Depart­ment of Justice for alleged harassment of an astronaut’s wife.

Think anything changed or improved in 40 years? Nope. People and cops still suck.
So does Selma, rapidly growing from 788 in the 2000 census to 10000 residents now, it’s moved it’s enforcement a little…

Not only is speed monitored along the access road (45 mph – do not increase speed until you are actually *ON* IH35!), but they will cite you for failing to yield (on the southbound access road), failure to come to complete stop (at intersection near Gillman Honda), crossing the double white line (northbound access road), etc. I was told by my policeman friend in NB that Selma PD are very heavy handed when it comes to vehicle searches

Similarly, Lumberton Texas has 75% of it’s police officers on patrol to issue tickets on highways 69 and 96

Lumberton police issued 22 tickets per day last year, third-most in the region behind Beaumont and Port Arthur.

and Selma’s speed trap is featured in the following

I’m just out of Austin bound for San Antone
With the radio blastin’ and the bird dog on

there is a covered wagon in Texas that has made the news papers a couple of times, the first time was in 1955, the second was more recent, when someone sent me a newspaper clipping, maybe in 2013

December 13th, 2017 by admin

May 16, 1955 The Eagle, Bryan, Texas

80 -Year Old Woman Wants To Repeat Wagon Venture

SHERMAN. Tex. — Her daughter paid a man 30 cents to teach her to harness a horse. The horse bit him. That’s why Ma Weaver paid the 30 cents. Then Ma and her two daughters were off by covered wagon for Denver, Colo. Today, 21 years later, that covered wagon is a permanent fixture in the side yard of her home at 322 N. Burdette St.

Mrs. Birdie Weaver, Ma to all who know her, has only one regret these days. She can’t find anyone to repeat the trip with her. She’s 80. “I’d buy a new wagon,” she dreams. The original has rotted to much for such a journey. “It’s the only way to travel. Automobiles is awful. Just perfectly awful. I wouldn’t go anywhere in a car.”

The trip started from here in October, 1934. Mother, Betty and Beatrice arrived in Denver six months later, spent a year and returned the same way. The younger women were in their 20s. Beatrice now is Mrs. R. D. Spangler. Why did they make the trip? “Just for the fun of it,” says Ma Weaver with finality. It was no typical prairie schooner which made the voyage. Instead of canvas, the covering was of sheet metal. Coops I underneath carried their chickens. Winnie the milk cow tagged along behind wearing special shoes designed by the Weavers.

keep the dream alive, if any kid tells some other kid what they "can’t do" point out how almost nothing can’t be done, especially in the Western hemisphere, that’s why we’re North AmeriCANs and South AmeriCANs

December 10th, 2017 by admin

A 10-year-old girl got to fly a plane for the first time last week, thanks to UPS’s Wishes Delivered campaign,

Taylor is going to be a UPS pilot: She knows this, and you should, too.

“When she was about 5, we took her to the Mall of America, and she got to fly in a plane, and she just knew that’s what she wanted to do with her life,” her mem said. “She was just amazed by it.”

She had taken Taylor to a Girls in Aviation day at Bowman Field, and the UPS Wishes Delivered crew was there, filming and scouting for a candidate, and they chose Taylor.

Wishes Delivered fulfills the dreams of children in various ways. In the past, a young boy who had a special relationship with a driver, was given a custom-made UPS package truck to drive around his neighborhood. The team once delivered snow to children in Texas who had never experienced snow before.

on Wednesday, Lyft will deploy cars from the 1930s in New York City to promote a new Budweiser beer called 1933 Repeal Reserve Amber Lager.

October 23rd, 2017 by admin

Riders looking for a 15-minute trip taking passengers “past landmarks and neighborhoods that were integral to Prohibition,” the vintage experience can sign up through Lyft’s website, and will receive a $10 credit to cover the cost of the ride.

The fleet of vintage cars includes a 1930 Buick, a 1936 Riley Kestrel, 1937 and 1938 Packards, and a 1942 Cadillac. Cars will only pick up riders in Manhattan between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Oct. 25.

“When Budweiser told us they wanted to offer a fleet of vintage cars to launch Repeal Reserve, we knew Lyft was the perfect option to celebrate the new recipe in a stylish and unexpected way,” said Melissa Waters, vice president of marketing, Lyft. “We encourage everyone to make the right choice to drink responsibly and keep our roads safe, and that’s why we continue to team up with Budweiser, a brand that shares the same commitment.”

Also as part of the marketing around the product, Budweiser is working with alcohol delivery service Drizly to offer consumers $5 off their first purchase of 1933 Repeal Reserve with the code Prohibition.

Budweiser and Lyft team up often, on holidays, to reduce drunk driving and celebrate those late-night heroes who give — and take — responsible rides home.

Each night thousands of Lyft drivers are doing their part to keep drunk drivers off the road.

Now Budweiser’s “Give a Damn. Don’t Drive Drunk” campaign is making the right choice easier than ever by providing up to 150,000 total round-trip rides during weekends and holidays through the end of the year. The rides will be available across 10 states: New York, Colorado, Illinois, Florida, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Texas, Georgia, and Washington, D.C.

More here:
on Wednesday, Lyft will deploy cars from the 1930s in New York City to promote a new Budweiser beer called 1933 Repeal Reserve Amber Lager.

A Sherman tank that landed at Normandy, and went on to liberate Paris and then rolled in into Berlin is pissing off an HOA in Houston Texas…. I can’t believe Texans would find it unappealing, but… old biddys, ya know? Well, this Marine vet of the Gulf War don’t give a shit

October 3rd, 2017 by admin

Who is Tony Buzbee? (the tank owner)

He grew up poor in Atlanta, Texas, one of four children of a butcher and high school cafeteria worker. “I’ve done that beyond any of my expectations.”

Buzbee mowed yards and worked at other jobs to make payments on his first car, a used 1974 Jeep CJ5.

He attended Texas A and M University on an ROTC scholarship, graduating in 1990.

After college, he entered the U.S. Marine Corps. As an infantry officer, he served in the Persian Gulf and Somalian conflicts, where he commanded various units.

He later was selected by the Marines to become a special forces officer, commanding an elite recon company in the fabled First Marine Regiment.

After Marine Corps service, he entered law school at the University of Houston. One of his first big wins came in 2001. Buzbee represented offshore drilling workers who alleged their wages had been suppressed by their employers. He won a $75 million judgment against Transocean Ltd.

He was notable last year for hosting Trump for a fundraiser —

And he’s earned a high profile in recent years, first defending former Governor Rick Perry on felony charges, then helping with Perry’s presidential campaign (

for some people motivation can be very different. Making yourself unhireable to common companies by tatting your face, neck and head, is one way to insure you’ll succeed on your own, according to Gary Queen

August 6th, 2017 by admin

Finding that most people won’t train anyone to do good work as a job security principle, meant learning their jobs off the clock, so he went to work when the 1st guy got there everyday, 530, and learned his job before his own shift started at 8

He got his start in custom painting at collision repair shops in Austin. He learned the trade from the ground up. His job was taping off cars before they were painted, but he would come into the shop hours ahead of his shift to learn the other guys’ jobs. It was the only way to break out of the dead end job of taping.

His boss at the time told him he didn’t want to teach him how to airbrush because he was afraid Queen would take his job. So Queen bought an airbrush and practiced in his garage. Over one weekend, he painted his truck.

“I pulled my truck next to his truck on Monday morning. My truck whooped his truck’s ass. I said, thanks for not teaching me how to paint. You were my motivation,” says Queen.

Queen worked his way up to a Lexus dealership, doing the repainting after collision repairs, but his tattoos got him in trouble with the boss, so he quit.

“When I opened my own shop, I had one tattoo on the back of my neck. I said, ‘If I put tattoos on my head I’m going to make it to where nobody will hire me; that will make me have to work harder at my own business,’” says Queen.

Queen switched from airbrushing to run his growing business, and hired two full-time airbrush artists, Mike Cissell and Tim Murphy. Both used to work at American IronHorse, a now defunct custom motorcycle manufacturer and Murphy is a trained artist who went to art school in Boston.

Murphy had a 20-year career as a custom engraver but said the work became physically painful, clutching tools day after day. He wanted to be an airbrush artist so after moving to Texas, he began working for American IronHorse. When it closed down, he came over to Other Side Customs.

Cissell had been a muralist and was doing airbrushing side jobs for friends, eventually building up a customer base. At one point he opened a mixed-use space so he could operate a gallery and give airbrush lessons in addition to his custom paint work, but had to shut it down because the city hassled him about the ceiling, not having separate bathrooms for each gender and not having enough ventilation.

Read the original here: 
for some people motivation can be very different. Making yourself unhireable to common companies by tatting your face, neck and head, is one way to insure you’ll succeed on your own, according to Gary Queen

Ford has a small problem. 1.33 million Ford Explorers, primarily police fleet vehicles, are under scrutiny for making the inhabitants sick from Carbon Monoxide poisoning. That’s serious shit.

July 31st, 2017 by admin

When the fleet level installation of police equipment occurred in Explorers, the holes in the floor weren’t sealed right. That lets in engine exhaust.

Plus, U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said it recently learned that the police version of the 2011-2017 Ford Explorer was experiencing exhaust manifold cracks.

The city of Austin, Texas said Friday it was removing all 400 of the city’s Ford Explorer SUVs from use.

More than 60 Austin officers filed workers compensation claims in the last five months, citing exposure to carbon monoxide.

the Prosperity Special

May 17th, 2017 by admin

the Prosperity Special was a train made up entirely 24 Baldwin locomotives, part of an order of 50, left on May 27, 1922. They “headed west out of the Baldwin Locomotive Plant to East St. Louis, took the Cotton Belt Line across Texas and was switched to SP tracks in El Paso.

Thousands of spectators lined the tracks to see an almost half mile long train made up entirely of new locomotives cross the country bound for California. A large sign was erected on the lead locomotive that read, ‘The Prosperity Special’.

The special arrived at Taylor Yard in Los Angeles in early June. Half of the locomotives would stay here and run heavy freights over Beaumont Hill and Tehachapi Pass. The rest of the locos went to Sacramento for duty over the Sierra Nevadas, the train stopped to take on water before the descent into Bakersfield and the trip up the valley to their new home in Sacramento.

A couple of years ago I posted this pic of the completed 50 at Eddystone, Pennsylvania:

Texas quail rigs… there are many variations on the basics, and they wound up in a book that captures them for posterity, a niche market of single use vehicles in a sport that is fading away as the baby boomers give up hunting

March 4th, 2017 by admin

Cars, indelibly linked as they are to the development of American geography, take on an entirely different identity as quail rigs, post-car vehicles fashioned alike from American classics, German military trucks, or icons of global luxury.

The scope of a vanishing tradition and culture of quail hunting in Texas reaches far beyond the art of photography. Lokey traveled throughout Texas’s quail country to photograph and study the trucks, each one of the 120 plus rigs is different, and reflects the personality of its owner and builder.