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West San Francisco had a street car neighborhood, made by accident when the Market Street Railway Company dumped the old horse-pulled railcars in the sand dunes to make room for the new electric and cable-driven streetcars. 1 remains

Thursday, March 15th, 2018 by admin

Map makers labeled the area on the coast the “Great Sand Waste” in the 1860s. Since it was about a city block away from the beach, you can understand why

In 1999, Preservation magazine did an article on the Carville house which featured lines such as “…the Sunset may be [San Francisco's] only neighborhood without a trace of apparent charm or history, a vast, drab tract of stucco houses sloping down to the sea.”

A San Francisco State student creating a special study report, James L. Heisterkamp kept a detailed diary of his 1994 search for Carville’s “last remnant”. He chatted with people in libraries, people on walks, people he met in cafés and laundromats. He knew from Natalie Jahraus Cowan’s California History article (Winter 1978/79, Vol. LVII) that 1415-47th Avenue used to be a Carville home, but the owner, Frank Lemus, told him there wasn’t any sign of streetcars left inside.

locals he met had never heard of Carville. “During my trekking up and down 47th, 48th, and the Great Highway, looking for the elusive remnant Carville cable cars, I was amazed by the number of people who never heard of the previous history of their own neighborhood. One man, in his forties or fifties, lived in the area about a half a block from the [Carville] address, for over 20 years and was unaware of cable cars ever being a part of some of the structure in his area.”

During an open house, Heisterkamp had the opportunity to take photos and chat with the owner. The old railcars made up the second floor, with the front door opening on a large room of two cable cars side by side, their interior sides removed.

Enter Scott Anderson, a filmmaker who lived in an apartment in the neighborhood. Anderson walked by the home one day, saw the “for sale” sign, and took a look inside. Stunned and entranced, he ended up buying the quirky structure.

Pat Halloran, Anderson’s tenant, gives me the great privilege to walk around inside his home. 2 Like James Heisterkamp and Scott Anderson before me, I marvel at the amount of original, historical fabric in the home. One wall has the wooden benches of the old cable car still built in. I sit where passengers in the 1890s sat, under the original tongue-and-groove slat ceiling, peering out side windows. Glass lanterns, old kerosene lamps, hang over the space, and it doesn’t take much to believe the room is about to rumble down a pair of rails. Pat’s bedroom and bathroom is an intact horse car, complete with a sliding panel door separating the two.

But you can’t tell how cool the interior is from the exterior, which wouldn’t give the normal pedestrian any idea that there are old street cars making up the house they’re walking past.

and the view from the back, that is pretty cool, isn’t something anyone can see unless they use Google Maps, Google Earth, or are on a nearby high roof

https://thebolditalic.com/photos-from-sf-s-abandoned-streetcar-neighborhood-the-bold-italic-san-francisco-6256d394db22
http://www.outsidelands.org/sw19.php
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carville,_San_Francisco

See original here:
West San Francisco had a street car neighborhood, made by accident when the Market Street Railway Company dumped the old horse-pulled railcars in the sand dunes to make room for the new electric and cable-driven streetcars. 1 remains

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